Cannon Cadets reminds me of a take on Angry Birds. Here you’ll have a cannon loaded with a little cadet. Use your finger to aim the cannon at a blockade across the screen. Your goal is to launch your cadet into a blockade that’s guarded by robots. Inside the blockade is another cadet who has been captured. When your cannon is aimed you draw your finger back to pull a plunger and get it prepped for launch. Let go and watch your cadet fly across the screen. When you knock down the obstacles and robots you’ll free the cadet and move on to the next level. There are four planets in the game (each has multiple levels) and a bonus stage. The game play is smooth, the graphics are bright and freeing the cadets is both challenging and entertaining.

In addition to playing the Cannon Cadets levels you can also build your own. In the Level Builder you design your own blockades by adding in obstacles, robots and more. The Level Builder is a very cool feature for those who enjoy building, playing with physics and working with the iPhone’s accelerometer. I personally haven’t tested this feature out.

My six year old son is enjoying Cannon Cadets. I took a peek at some of the levels he has created and he’s got the basics down, even if he’s made challenges that are impossible to defeat. He really gets a kick out of shooting the cadets and defeating the robots. My overall impression of the game is that it’s a friendly experience. I don’t think it’s going to be as addicting as Angry Birds but that’s not necessarily a bad thing and in the long run probably better for the kids.

Cannon Cadets is a universal app and will work on your iPhone and iPad. We’ve been playing it on the iPhone.

Price when Reviewed: $.99

See the app in iTunes

Seller: XMG Studio Inc.

Disclosure: I received a free copy of this app for review purposes.


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TheiPhoneMom

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One Response

  1. Yusuf

    why: if men in with an artificial amuont of power have a standing army, they will use it. Politicians call the shots on who soldiers go to kill, Xavier. Politicians are invariably not noble, they are not wise, and they are not prudent. That is why the Founding Fathers wanted a militia. They would only be a defensive force, because they have no interest in going off to war. Politicians and professional soldiers do not want to lose their jobs. Citizens have their own, separate jobs. They stand to lose everything in the face of an invasion. There is nothing the military is doing, or can do to prevent any other people from attacking the U.S., like the Saudis (not Iraqis) did on 9/11. There was nothing they could do the first time, either. As Michael Scheuer and Bin Laden said, their presence overseas was the motivating factor for the attacks in the first place. They don’t hate “us” because “we’re” free. They hate the United State military and political presence, and I don’t blame them for that. I blame them for killing civilians, however. Would a militia be able to defend Americans against a full-scale nuclear attack? No, but neither could any United State ground troops of any MOS. It seems as though the shepherd and shopkeeper Afghanis are doing a pretty decent job at driving out their third modern military in a little over a century. If a society cannot defend itself without taking money from non-violent people by force or threat of force, or from forcing people to fight for them by threatening them with imprisonment or execution [the draft, which we do not currently have, but they do threaten current "volunteers" with prison and execution if they decide to quit] then that society has forfeited its right to continue to exist. If achieving one’s end requires the use of evil means, then one’s end may not be morally achieved.

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